Keezer Collar Build

Kyle and recently did a build out on my keg freezer. After seeing an article posted by The Mad Fermentationist, Michael Tonsmeire. You can read his build out for the collar here.  It was a reasonably easy build that spanned about three days with approximately 12-14 hours of actual work. That includes taking the time to plan it out, acquire materials and put them all together.

Finished Collar - Works great, very limited amount of run time. Once at temp its functioned solidly and pouring beer from this guy is a dream. I feel like the 20lb CO2 tank is the only way to go. Some people like to put a fan inside to help with condensation problems, I don't have any issues with condensation and I'm about two months into running this guy.

Finished Collar - Works great, very limited amount of run time. Once at temp its functioned solidly and pouring beer from this guy is a dream. I feel like the 20lb CO2 tank is the only way to go. Some people like to put a fan inside to help with condensation problems, I don't have any issues with condensation and I'm about two months into running this guy.

Table or miter saw is a must, you've got to get those boards cut straight. We mitered our edges using the table saw (neither Kyle nor myself own a miter saw)  but I'd definitely suggest the use of a miter saw over the table, just easier to cut. 

Table or miter saw is a must, you've got to get those boards cut straight. We mitered our edges using the table saw (neither Kyle nor myself own a miter saw)  but I'd definitely suggest the use of a miter saw over the table, just easier to cut. 

Once you've got it all cut check your level and fit on the top of your keezer. Keep in mind you'll need to use some silicon caulk to fill in the gaps, and consider using some form of insulation to aid in filling the gaps.

Once you've got it all cut check your level and fit on the top of your keezer. Keep in mind you'll need to use some silicon caulk to fill in the gaps, and consider using some form of insulation to aid in filling the gaps.

Several coats of paint were required. We used spray paint, chalkboard and ended up taking a day or two to let it dry and repaint to get everything even. Kyle and I didn't care for how the wood looked on the white so we went the same route as the Mad Fermentationist. 

Several coats of paint were required. We used spray paint, chalkboard and ended up taking a day or two to let it dry and repaint to get everything even. Kyle and I didn't care for how the wood looked on the white so we went the same route as the Mad Fermentationist. 

Picking a mounting point for your CO2 manifold is key. Make sure you place everything inside and feel out what works best for you before drilling.

Picking a mounting point for your CO2 manifold is key. Make sure you place everything inside and feel out what works best for you before drilling.

You can mount your temp controller anywhere. I opted for the right side on mine where I could still access it easily. Didn't want to have to move the keezer any more often than I had to. Once loaded this guy is heavy!

You can mount your temp controller anywhere. I opted for the right side on mine where I could still access it easily. Didn't want to have to move the keezer any more often than I had to. Once loaded this guy is heavy!

If you've got the time, materials and ability I definitely suggest you build yourself one of these. Great to not have to open my lid and it really does look nice. The faucets and tubing, manifold etc. those are the most expensive components... Wood only ended up costing around $40. You can always scrounge for scraps too!

-Brett